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BBC World News America

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00:30:00

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Egypt 8, U.s. 8, Syria 6, America 5, Lebanon 4, Gregg 3, Mexico 3, Us 3, Bp 2, Morsi 2, Pbs 2, Burma 2, Britain 2, Belarus 2, Pentico 1, Ferro 1, Leval 1, Vladimir Putin 1, Adam Brooks 1, Laura Trevelyan 1,
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  PBS    BBC World News America    News/Business. U.S.-targeted  
   nightly newscast. (CC) (Stereo)  

    November 28, 2012
    4:00 - 4:30pm PST  

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-- laura trevelyan. searching for a better life outside syria, some pretty gee's find themselves in limbo, now fighting for basic needs. is there life beyond earth? we will tell you about the frigid spider. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. for 60 -- six days in egypt, the protesters have been demanding the president to give up his sweeping powers. the judge's claim the new president is seeking bloody revenge.
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as both sides digging in, is there any end in sight? >> pensions are rising between president morsi and the egyptian judiciary. some protests over him giving himself extensive new powers. the spokesman says the president has joined in the campaign against the court. >> the egyptian supreme constitutional court will not be terrorized by any threat or blackmail, and it will not be subjected to any pressure from anyone come on a matter how forcible the pressure. we are ready to face this, whatever the consequences. >> meanwhile, the final draft of egypt's new constitution is said to be on the verge of completion. in tahrir square, there is a
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mood of defiance. more tents have sprung up. the demonstrators say they will continue their protests. many people in the square accused the president of hijacking the revolution. earlier, tear-gas was fired at a separate demonstration near tahrir square. the demonstration on sunday night was a strong show of support for the opposition. tens of thousands of demonstrators stream into the square. they chanted against the president and the main group of supporters, the muslim brotherhood. but it is not clear if president morsi ready to offer concessions. there is a rally called for saturday in support of the president. >> despite the recent turmoil in egypt, could there be some sober linings to the cloud? that is the argument that mahomet all area and from
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pentico has made in a recent article. -- pick muhammed el-erian has made in a recent article. what exactly is all of the brightness to this chaos? >> it is important to understand the context. egypt is trying to give it -- put from its past -- pivot from its past into its future without the proper institutions and without a mandela-type leader. it is a very bumpy road. there are now checks and balances in egypt. this is no longer a society where you can ram through changes. and there is nothing more powerful than citizens who feel they have a say in the destiny of their country. because of that, you can think of the future, which will be one
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where the egyptians will be able to take control of their economy much more so than before. it tells you that the egyptians feel they own the country, and that is very important. >> what do you say of the critique that if you can simply replaced one ferro with another? >> i would say it is not that -- one ferro -- pharoah with another? >> i would say it is not that bad. in the old days under a pharoah there would be no protests in the street. today, people feel empowered to control their destinies. >> even if people are demonstrating for a better future, where will the jobs come from? but i am one that believes the egyptian economy has been repressed for a long time.
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with proper management and an inclusive growth model, as opposed to one that just serves special interests, and with help from outside, egypt can unleash its private-sector. if that materializes, then drops will materialize and party will go down. -- jobs will materialize and poverty will go down. it is a bumpy voyage, but possible. >> how can he do to fill the role of law, which is all important? -- how can egypt fulfilled a rule of law, which is all important? >> kurram burk, egypt only have one is -- remember, egypt only have one institution before the revolution, the military. what egypt is trying to do simultaneously is find leaders, build institutions, and meet the aspirations that had been billed
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very high during a very successful and peaceful revolution. that is not easy. it will take time to build institutions and impose the role of -- the rule of law. >> the ceasefire in gaza, will that help to win egypt friends abroad? >> i think it shows they play a special role in the middle east. and they are regaining their traditional role in the region. it is good as long as the president does not believe he can then take about -- take that and cashed in for a grant of power, which is the concern of some. >> do you think he is the leader to take them into the near future? greta i think he was -- >> i think he was elected democratically in a free and fair election. think of egypt as slowly putting in place all of the various elements of a country that has greater democracy and greater
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respect for human rights, but it will take time. in the meantime, you will be reporting about a very loud and noisy process. by its very nature it is a very bumpy process. >> indeed, we will. thank you for joining us. turning to syria, where two car bombs ripped through damascus suburb today. it is known for being loyal to president assad. the more than 30 were killed. over 80 were injured. the attack comes as fighting inside the country intensifies, making the refugee situation even worse. according to the united nations, more than 100,000 have fled into lebanon. and thousands more are on the waiting list. the war has put huge strains on neighboring countries, leading many struggling. -- leaving many families struggling.
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and >> the northern border of lebanon with syria, this is where thousands of refugees have escaped in august to years to escape serious moral and war -- syria's pergo civil war. -- berchtold civil war. this family had fled here because it's other boy, 3-year- old mohammed, had been abducted by pro-government militia and was presumed dead. now he has had to move on. the baby is older and stronger, but the family was forced to leave the school because of tensions because -- between local lebanese and the refugees. >> we left because of all the trouble there.
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sometimes i did not feel safe to be in a room. we may have been better off in syria. >> now in a different village, he is still not settled. he often goes back across the border to help the rebels inside syria. on one trip he shot this dramatic footage of an ssa attack on a government building in homs. some more refugees arrived in lebanon every day. in his old room at the school we found another family lovain, eating, and sleeping in the tiny space. -- living, eating, and is living in a tiny space. he has no hope of returning home anytime soon. >> living under the sky only to
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come back to my home. >> the un estimates that 100,000 syrian refugees are now in lebanon. the strain is telling on both communities. with their lives on hold, these refugees are preparing for a second winter stuck in this school. it will be cold and wet. and with bashar assad hanging on to power, and with relations with the lebanese here at worsening, they do not know how long they will be here. >> more than 150 people have been wounded in a second day of clashes in a town in trudi -- trinidad. security used rubber bullets to disperse the -- disperse the crowd. there are reports as well as a shot gun injuries. these are the latest in a series of protests by those disappointed in a lack of
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progress following the revolution. the european commission has approved plans by the spanish government to restructure troubled banks. the banks will receive 37 billion euros, but they will have to cut thousands of jobs in return. and they will be forced to recognize losses they suffered from the property crash. it has been more than two years since an explosion on an oil rig in the gulf of mexico released one of the worst oil spills in u.s. history. the obama administration announced is putting a temporary stop on new federal contracts with bp. for more on the financial impact, i spoke with adam brooks. and what does this actually need for bp? >> it means they still have not been forgiven for the explosion in the deep water rights in that killed 11 people and pumped millions of gallons of oil into the gulf of mexico in 2010. it means that in addition to
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$4.5 billion in fines that they have agreed to pay, a leading criminal charges, bp will now not -- pleading guilty to criminal charges, bp will now not in -- get any new business in the u.s. >> how much business does vp actually have with the u.s. government at the moment? >> most people point to its contract that it has today, $1.4 billion in fuel that it sold to the u.s. last year. bp employs 23,000 people here and has billions of dollars in investments. it was hinting that it was not in america's interest to allow bp's business here to go under. another important thing, they have new drilling with it -- leases in the gulf of mexico. >> leval they have to do to get in on those lucrative contracts in the future? >> they -- the u.s. government
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will have to agree that they are within the standards they are supposed to be. >> they have taken a long time to get to this point. the oil spill was over two years ago. why has it taken such a long time? >> it is because bp agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges and pay the enormous fines earlier this month. the stage was set for the epa to make this contractual disbarment. >> thank you. you are watching bbc world news america. still to come, famous for their wartime adventures in the sky. it might surprise you to find where dozens might be buried. the speculation surrounding the health of the russian president, vladimir putin, is stirred
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again. this time by comments from the leader of belarus. he said that he injured his spine are wrestling, which led him to delay a planned hockey match. here are the details on the story. >> he drives fast cars. he pilots planes. he likes -- up close and personal with theirs. but for the moment, russia's president might be better off putting his feet up and taking it easy for a while. there have been rumors about his health for months. the kremlin has reportedly canceled several foreign trips and anonymous government sources put the blame on mr. putin's babaji back. now those terms -- dodgy back. now those rumors have been confirmed. >> he likes to wrestle. i told him, you cannot do this
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anymore. what do you want, to do professional wrestling somewhere or what? and he says, well, i just like to drag around on inaccurate he was wrestling -- on a mac. he was wrestling and when he threw him over, he twisted his spine. >> there have been claims that some of his adventures were staged. this is an ally of the president. they have had their moments of closeness as well as their spats. he was an award -- he was awarded a studio just two spots from the highest award of the national federation. it is hoped that the promised game of hot ice hockey does not come even more -- become even more physical.
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gregg's a now to some research from -- >> and now to some research from an extremely remote corner of the earth. it is thought that life could exist on the part of the planted -- planet that was thought too cold to sustain it. a thick sheet of ice on a lake in antarctica has been sealed off for many years. what did they find there? joining us now is a scientist from the reno, nev. research institute. what did they find at the bottom of the lake that has been sealed off for thousands of years? >> it is a very dark environment. there is no light from the surface. it is very cold. we think it is one of the most stable cold environment that also has a liquid water. the water in the lower lake ice is in this spiderweb network,
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connected in different layers from 16 meters all the way down to 27 meters. >> sounds amazing. what did you find? gregg's we drove our scores from the a lake surface. -- >> we drilled from the lake's surface. we found a syrupy brian. when we brought the brine to a surface we looked to see if there was any life. we found there was quite abundant cellular life. much to our surprise. and then we took the brine back to the lab to detect if there was metaphorically active. -- metabolic lee active. >> could it be supporting live down there, like fish, or loch ness monster?
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>> the only life forms we have found is a bacteria. >> what are the implications of what you found? >> this gives us a perspective that life can exist and be sustained for thousands of years without any influence from the surface. and there may be points to other places on earth where we can look for life, glaciers, other places in the antarctic. >> and how about in space? could there be implications for a galaxy far, far away? >> yes, this has expanded our vision of the habit ability of grifo environments. -- how bitability of what cryo-
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environments are. >> where will you be going next? >> pipa good question. we will be working on some lakes in -- >> a good question. we will be working on some lakes in the high arctic. >> any plans to go in space? gregg's the expeditions to space -- >> the expeditions to space, as the world knows, the curiosity rover is on mars right now and we are looking forward to the results that will be coming from curiosity. >> history is nothing new, but this next story is about an unusual treasure. you have heard of the spitfire, the plane was best known for its role in defending britain during world war ii. but i bet you did not know that it was buried in burma. it was shipped to the country in
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1945. when the war against the japanese came in -- came to an abrupt end, there were buried so they would not fall into the wrong hands. >> they are the plane that helped win the battle of britain. the cease-fire that once -- the spitfire that once fought in the skies over europe. they were shipped to burma, but when the war with japan and its, some say they were buried. some have spent the last 60 years trying to track them down. he believes he has now located more than 30 spitfires, carefully boxed in wooden crates, waiting to be found. >> i knew the airplanes were there. i tracked down eight eyewitnesses. they all told me the same story. i have had professional survey is done by the university of leeds. i have ground radar images.
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everything is pointing to that we have found them. >> this is an old air base on the edge of the jungle just outside rangoon. scientists who have already visited the site have detected what would appear to be large concentrations of metal in the ground. they met arafat is shaded red. -- the area is shaded red. >> whether it is, metal or spitfires, we do not know. it is not like there is a spat -- a setting for spitfires and a setting for scrap metal. >> david cameron helped to pave the way. permission for the day was only given after foreign relations. the excavation will be funded by businessmen from belarus. >> this is probably one of the last great adventures of the century. it is indiana jones if you look
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at it closely. we just jumped in. >> some have ended up in museums. 35 are still flying, each worth more than one vote -- 1 million pounds. these could be better -- buried treasures or an expensive wild goose chase. >> it is time to dream a little bit. what would you do if he won half a billion dollars? tonight, a lot of people are hoping they will have that tough a dilemma of. if they pick the right numbers in the powerball lottery. it is the second-biggest part in u.s. history. >> it is the ticket buying fever that has taken america by storm. 550 million u.s. dollars and counting.
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that is more than half a billion dollars in winnings. >> i'm going to the bahamas. >> i quit, just as simple as that. >> i will be paying off my house. >> i will give it to some charity, you know. for hurricane sandy. about 105,000 tickets every minute will be sold today in the lead up to the drop. look at the odds. wanted it will give you a one in 175 million chance -- one ticket will give you a one in 175 million chance of winning. if the lucky person was one person, they could take home half a billion dollars lump-sum, or payments of $60 million a year for the next 29 years. the drop is the second-biggest
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in u.s. history. in march, $640 million was 1 when three millionaires which drew the right numbers. with the drawing only hours away, you cannot help but think. >> maybe i should go and buy tickets now. that brings today show to a close. you can find constant updates on our website. from me and most of the bbc team possibly go to twitter. for all of us here, thanks for watching. see you back here tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news.
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>> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard -- use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> bbc world news was
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- hi, neighbour! today prince wednesday is coming over to play at the beach! and then we're going to music man stan's music shop to play with the instruments! will you come play too? i'll be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life,
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and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪
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♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood! ♪ - hi, neighbour! come on in! i can't wait to go play at jungle beach today! and... prince wednesday's here! - hello, hello, hello. it's me, prince wednesday. i have my royal pail, and i have my royal shovel, and i'm ready for the beach. (both laughing) - beach day, beach day! swimmy-swim-swim. hey, want to pretend to swim with me? (chuckling) come on! swim, swim, swim! i can't wait to go to the beach! - swimming, swimming, swimming! - swimmy, swim, swim, swim.

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